Principle Ten

Felicitous greetings and salutations,

Reformer’s Unanimous is a faith-based addictions program dedicated to helping those bound by the shackles of sin to find liberty through Christ. They have assisted me greatly in the time that I have spent in their program and in the study of their materials. They have shown great wisdom in their understanding of the problems that beset us in our struggles in the process of sanctification. One of the bits of wisdom that Steve Currington, its founder and president, has propagated is the Ten Principles of RU. These ten principles are founded in Scripture, and are true and helpful to every Christian who is wanting to find Christ’s victory over sin in his life. Therefore, I am expounding these ten principles in a series of posts spread out over this month. This is the tenth.

GOD BALANCES GUILT WITH BLAME. ACCEPT THE BLAME FOR YOUR ACTIONS AND GOD WILL REMOVE THE GUILT.

There is a very important purpose to guilt: to bring you to brokenness at the feet of God. But most people will not want to do that. They want to get rid of that guilt and retain their pride. The only way they can do that is to pass the blame off on other people or circumstances. But this only masks the guilt for a short time: it does not remove it. And in the end, it only adds to it: for you are merely lying to yourself and others, which causes more guilt. Life becomes miserable.

Until you submit to God, accept the blame, bow at His feet, and humbly admit your wrongs.

Then God will remove the guilt, and you will be free. Only until you accept that you are the one responsible for your sins, will you be able to find liberty from guilt.

Contriteness is a good thing: you should be seeking it out, praying for it, desperately pleading God to lead you to repentance.

2 Corinthians 7:10 For godly sorrow worketh repentance to salvation not to be repented of: but the sorrow of the world worketh death.

With joy and peace in Christ,

Jay Lauser

Riddle me this too

Greetings,

My most profuse apologies to you all. I was supposed to post this yesterday, and I am only just now doing it. Therefore, I will give you two riddles instead of one. Remember to not post the answer in the comments, only your confusion. Email me your guesses. 🙂

Here is the one that I made up, let me know what you think!

“Abdullah was fat. He was so fat that every evening when he went out to peruse the market stalls of his city, he had to force his way out of the widest door in his small house. One day he had more trouble than usual, and was in great fear lest he would be unable to return through it if he ate anything while he was out. He wandered about for some time, doing nothing but walking, and eating nothing but a sesame seed that he inadvertently picked up. He returned late in the evening to find that, indeed, he could not fit through the door at all. He therefore spent all night in great discomfort on his threshold; until the morning, when he got up and entered his abode with the usual difficulty.”

Now here is the bonus one that I did not make up.

“You are a young man, intent on rising in the world. You are overjoyed one day to discover that you have been invited to join a very exclusive society, which membership would aid you inestimably. You accept and are instructed to go to the society that evening for your initiation.

“This initiation is quite simple, but risky. You are instructed to wait in the foyer until a bell rings in the hall where the entire society sits to judge. You are then blindfolded and led into the hall and up to a pedestal, whereon is a hat with two slips of paper in it. On one is written ‘Stays,’ on the other is written ‘Leaves.’ If you choose the one that says the former, you will be accepted into the society, and your future is assured. If you choose the latter, or if you speak a word throughout the entire ceremony, you are forever banned from membership, and are ignominiously kicked out the door, quite literally.

“As you stand in the foyer, waiting nervously for this ordeal by lot, you see a lifelong enemy approach you (who is a member of the society), and gleefully inform you that he has, unbeknown to the society at large, replaced the ‘Stays’ slip with a second ‘Leaves’ slip, ensuring your vigorous removal. As soon as he leaves you standing in shock, the bell rings, you are blindfolded, and led to your doom.

“Your puzzle is to defeat your enemy, and gain entrance into the society.”

Have fun!

Principle Nine

Felicitous greetings and salutations,

Reformer’s Unanimous is a faith-based addictions program dedicated to helping those bound by the shackles of sin to find liberty through Christ. They have assisted me greatly in the time that I have spent in their program and in the study of their materials. They have shown great wisdom in their understanding of the problems that beset us in our struggles in the process of sanctification. One of the bits of wisdom that Steve Currington, its founder and president, has propagated is the Ten Principles of RU. These ten principles are founded in Scripture, and are true and helpful to every Christian who is wanting to find Christ’s victory over sin in his life. Therefore, I am expounding these ten principles in a series of posts spread out over this month. This is the ninth.

WE LOSE OUR FREEDOM TO CHOOSE WHEN WE GIVE IN TO TEMPTATION. OUR CONSEQUENCES ARE INEVITABLE, INCALCULABLE, AND UP TO GOD.

I understand that once you hit a ball in baseball, you can’t control it anymore. Once it goes thwack, it is gone and you have no more influence over it than if you had never seen it. Of course, I have never really played sports, so I might be wrong (maybe).

But I know that this principle holds true in the spiritual world, in your walk with God, and in life in general.

Sin has consequences. Period. Full-stop. You can’t get around it. It is as inevitable as gravity. God’s mercy can and will alleviate it, and help you through it, and teach you by it, and turn it aside, but there are consequences to every action.

We have no control over them. When you sin, you are casting yourself onto the mercy of God, and you have no idea what He might do. He will always do the best thing, but that best thing might be very painful for you to endure. Rely on ‘getting out of things’ and you will find yourself in a place that you cannot get out of.

The only way to make sure that you will not incur the wrath of God, is to avoid sinning. Yield to His grace, and to His will. Yield to Him before you sin, and it will be easier.

With joy and peace in Christ,

Jay Lauser

Principle Eight

Felicitous greetings and salutations,

Reformer’s Unanimous is a faith-based addictions program dedicated to helping those bound by the shackles of sin to find liberty through Christ. They have assisted me greatly in the time that I have spent in their program and in the study of their materials. They have shown great wisdom in their understanding of the problems that beset us in our struggles in the process of sanctification. One of the bits of wisdom that Steve Currington, its founder and president, has propagated is the Ten Principles of RU. These ten principles are founded in Scripture, and are true and helpful to every Christian who is wanting to find Christ’s victory over sin in his life. Therefore, I am expounding these ten principles in a series of posts spread out over this month. This is the eighth.

IT IS NOT POSSIBLE TO FIGHT A FLESHLY TEMPTATION WITH FLESHLY WEAPONS.

First off, let us define some terms.

A temptation (in this context) is pressure from the world, your flesh, or the devil on you, trying to get you to go against what God wants you to do. When the world tempts you, it always appeals to your flesh in some way or other, and the devil does the same thing. Therefore, all these temptations are fleshly.

But what is a fleshly weapon? A fleshly weapon is anything that you use to combat those temptations that is not what God wants you to use. You are deciding, in your flesh, to do what God wants, but not in the way that God wants.

So this principle is simply stating that the only way to live life God’s way in the face of temptation, is to combat that temptation God’s way, and not your way. Pretty simple, isn’t it?

So why do we forget it?

Because we don’t want to remember it.

We don’t want to be humbled, we don’t want to have to give up and give it to God, we don’t want to admit that we can’t do it, we don’t want to let go of our pride.

We want to win.

But when we win, we are actually losing. We are giving up the ground to the enemy. Even if we do not do what the temptation told us to, we yielded to another temptation, and we made the stronghold of pride yet stronger. And it is from that stronghold that all the armies of hell march.

With joy and peace in Christ,

Jay Lauser

Pray Without Ceasing… Really?

1 Thessalonians 5:17 Pray without ceasing.

1 Thessalonians 5:17 Pray(4336) without ceasing(89).

[Is this saying that we ought to be praying every moment, or that we ought never to stop praying regularly and consistently?]

Strongs Greek 4336
proseuchomai — pros-yoo’-khom-ahee — from 4314 and 2172; to pray to God, i.e. supplicate, worship: — pray (X earnestly, for), make prayer.

Matthew 6:9-13 After this manner therefore pray(4336) ye: Our Father which art in heaven, Hallowed be thy name.
10 Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done in earth, as [it is] in heaven.
11 Give us this day our daily bread.
12 And forgive us our debts, as we forgive our debtors.
13 And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil: For thine is the kingdom, and the power, and the glory, for ever. Amen.

[First of all, this is a broad sense of the word ‘prayer.’ It includes both supplication and worship. Thus, it would be possible to ‘pray’ in a sense by your every action that is dedicated to God. However, it is never used in this sense, and, when you can tell, it always seems to refer to an actual speaking to God.]

Strongs Greek 89
adialeiptos — ad-ee-al-ipe’-toce — adverb from 88; uninteruptedly, i.e. without omission (on an appropriate occasion): — without ceasing.

[Notice the phrase ‘without omission.’ The explanatory parenthesis also gives the impression that this is talking about consistent meeting with God, and not every-moment-of-every-day.]

Strongs Greek 88
adialeiptos — ad-ee-al’-ipe-tos — from 1 (as a negative particle) and a derivative of a compound of 1223 and 3007; unintermitted, i.e. permanent: — without ceasing, continual.

[Intermittent (by Webster’s 1828) means to ‘utterly cease at intervals’ (paraphrased). Therefore, this still maintains the possibility that we ought to be regular and continually consistent in our prayers, but not necessarily every moment. One can go farther, and the etymology bears this out, but going too far back puts you on shaky ground in hermeneutics.]

Romans 1:9 For God is my witness, whom I serve with my spirit in the gospel of his Son, that without ceasing(89) I make mention of you always in my prayers;

1 Thessalonians 1:3 Remembering without ceasing(89) your work of faith, and labour of love, and patience of hope in our Lord Jesus Christ, in the sight of God and our Father;

1 Thessalonians 2:13 For this cause also thank we God without ceasing(89), because, when ye received the word of God which ye heard of us, ye received it not as the word of men, but as it is in truth, the word of God, which effectually worketh also in you that believe.

[Notice that all these passages point to a consistent remembering to do something, not doing it every moment. Paul is saying that he has not given up these things.]

CEASE, v.i.
1. To stop moving, acting or speaking; to leave of; to give over; followed by from before a noun.
It is an honor for a man to cease from strife. Prov 20.
2. To fail; to be wanting.
The poor shall never cease out of the land. Deu 15.
3. To stop; to be at an end; as, the wonder ceases; the storm has ceased.
4. To be forgotten.
I would make the remembrance of them to cease. Deu 32.
5. To abstain; as, cease from anger. Psa 37.
To cease from labor, is to rest; to cease from strife, is to be quiet; but in such phrases, the sense of cease is not varied.
CEASE, v.t. To put a stop to; to put an end to. Cease this impious rage. [But in this use the phrase is generally elliptical,]
CEASE, n. Extinction.

[Webster’s 1828 dictionary clearly defines ‘ceasing’ to be a complete cessation, not a pausing.]

Realize that I am not going back on my avowed extremism. Many people (including myself, before I did this study) hold to the idea that we ought to be praying every moment of every day. They hold to this, not because there is lexicological support for that view, but because it seems more godly and devout. This is not to say that they are wrong to want to be godly and devout: it is very good to be godly and devout. We just need to do it God’s way, and not our way. We need to be extremely diligent and consistent in our prayers: they are a vital part of our life line. We need to dedicate each and every action and thought to God (‘bringing into captivity every thought’ 2 Cor. 10:5).

But then, there is the question of how often are we to pray? To me, the question is academic: in practical life we simply pray as much as we can, as well as we can. There is a lot to pray for, and little time to do it in. We can pray as we read our Bibles, we can pray as we walk down the street (we need to do that), we can pray when we wake at night. David prayed seven times a day. From what I can tell, he did it when he arose, when he ate each of his three meals, at midday, at evening, and at midnight (but that is just speculation on my part). Seven.

But remember: prayer is talking to God, and the way we get an answer is by reading His Word. We need to allow God to speak to us too, so read, study, and meditate on the Bible as much as you can. These two things are our food and our drink. We do not dare to let our spirit starve.

What are your thoughts on this Bible study? How often do you pray? How often would you like to?

Riddle me This

Greetings,

I was asked to supply a riddle for my readers. This is difficult to do, for when one answers it, the others lose their fun of solving it. However, part of the fun is struggling to get it, and if we cannot share in that fun, it is little fun at all. So, if you already know the answer to the riddle, kindly refrain from hints and answers, so that others may enjoy themselves more.

I stood upon the shifting ground,

The words from stony lips above,

Dropped like spoken doom upon me.

First, four legs hath he,

Next, two legs hath he,

Lastly, behold, three.

If thou canst not tell me he,

Dead that instant shalt thou be.

Principle Seven

Felicitous greetings and salutations,

Reformer’s Unanimous is a faith-based addictions program dedicated to helping those bound by the shackles of sin to find liberty through Christ. They have assisted me greatly in the time that I have spent in their program and in the study of their materials. They have shown great wisdom in their understanding of the problems that beset us in our struggles in the process of sanctification. One of the bits of wisdom that Steve Currington, its founder and president, has propagated is the Ten Principles of RU. These ten principles are founded in Scripture, and are true and helpful to every Christian who is wanting to find Christ’s victory over sin in his life. Therefore, I am expounding these ten principles in a series of posts spread out over this month. This is the seventh.

OUR SINFUL HABITS CAN HURT THOSE WHO FOLLOW US.

We always tend to think in terms of ourself, naturally. We look at what we do in private, and say that our sins can only hurt us. After all, “What they don’t know won’t hurt ’em,” right?

Wrong.

There are several reasons why this is wrong, but I will focus on two.

Firstly, we cannot compartmentalize our sin. If we yield to the flesh and the devil in one area, we are not walking in the Spirit. We are yielding our members to sin. Our whole walk with God is dramatically altered for the worse, and we do not have access to the life-giving and life strengthening presence of His Holy Spirit (at least not as much as before).

That means that sin will spread to every other area of our life. If we lust, our tongues will soon become bitter and angry. If we refuse to forgive, our hearts will start to envy. Etc. We cannot escape it.

Galatians 5:16 [This] I say then, Walk in the Spirit, and ye shall not fulfil the lust of the flesh.

Romans 6:16 Know ye not, that to whom ye yield yourselves servants to obey, his servants ye are to whom ye obey; whether of sin unto death, or of obedience unto righteousness?

Secondly, we cannot guarantee that others will remain unknowing of our sin. God does punish willful sin, and He sometimes does so in ways that are public (many times He does so). We cannot control our consequences, only our actions and choices. The only way to keep other people from finding out about your sin, is to not do it.

Luke 12:2-3 For there is nothing covered, that shall not be revealed; neither hid, that shall not be known.
3 Therefore whatsoever ye have spoken in darkness shall be heard in the light; and that which ye have spoken in the ear in closets shall be proclaimed upon the housetops.


With joy and peace in Christ,

Jay Lauser

Principle six

Felicitous greetings and salutations,

Reformer’s Unanimous is a faith-based addictions program dedicated to helping those bound by the shackles of sin to find liberty through Christ. They have assisted me greatly in the time that I have spent in their program and in the study of their materials. They have shown great wisdom in their understanding of the problems that beset us in our struggles in the process of sanctification. One of the bits of wisdom that Steve Currington, its founder and president, has propagated is the Ten Principles of RU. These ten principles are founded in Scripture, and are true and helpful to every Christian who is wanting to find Christ’s victory over sin in his life. Therefore, I am expounding these ten principles in a series of posts spread out over this month. This is the sixth.

THOSE WHO DO NOT LOVE THE LORD WILL NOT HELP US SERVE THE LORD.

This is a subject that is fraught with mistakes, misunderstandings, and misapplications (to alliterate). People get very uptight about some interpretations of this, leading to outright rebellion against it, or to prudish, puritanical, and Pharisaical self-righteousness (another alliteration). So listen closely and pay attention to the semantics. They are important.

Realize that there is a profound difference between fellowship and mingling. This is exemplified in the phrase “In the world, but not of it,” which came from Jesus’ statement in John 17:11-18:

John 17:11-18 And now I am no more in the world, but these are in the world, and I come to thee. Holy Father, keep through thine own name those whom thou hast given me, that they may be one, as we [are.]
12 While I was with them in the world, I kept them in thy name: those that thou gavest me I have kept, and none of them is lost, but the son of perdition; that the scripture might be fulfilled.
13 And now come I to thee; and these things I speak in the world, that they might have my joy fulfilled in themselves.
14 I have given them thy word; and the world hath hated them, because they are not of the world, even as I am not of the world.
15 I pray not that thou shouldest take them out of the world, but that thou shouldest keep them from the evil.
16 They are not of the world, even as I am not of the world.
17 Sanctify them through thy truth: thy word is truth.
18 As thou hast sent me into the world, even so have I also sent them into the world.


By living, you are mingling. You do so when you go shopping, when you go into the city, when you do anything with anyone. Some people avoid mingling, and they live in perpetual hermitage, but I am sure that I need not attempt to dissuade you from that notion.

Fellowship is, in essence, drawing pleasure and strength from the company of someone or something. It is a partnership. It is intimate. (There are of course other meanings that are used with impunity in other contexts.) We are commanded to walk in fellowship with God and His church. We are also commanded to not walk in fellowship with the world.

Remember that mingling and fellowship are two different things. You can witness to people, help people, teach people, learn from people, and work with people, and not fellowship with them (in this sense of the word). You cannot really fellowship with people and not mingle with them in some way, however. That is because fellowshipping is a deeper and more intimate level of mingling. It is a mingling of souls, a trust, a mutual giving and partaking.

We must mingle with the world, but we cannot fellowship with the world, then. So what does that mean in our life?

Well, what do you do to rest? What can you relax doing? What motivates you and gets you going again. TV? Sports? Video games? ?

Bible reading? Godly music? Praying? ?

Think about it. Study it. Pray to God to help you discern what you are fellowshipping with. And keep this principle in mind:

THOSE WHO DO NOT LOVE THE LORD WILL NOT HELP US SERVE THE LORD.

Ironhand

Greetings,

This is the first of my two stories that I wrote for Vision Forum’s story contest.

The blood raged in my head as I reached out and took an apple from the board, holding it high. I crushed it in my hand, sending slippery pulp running down my arm and dripping to the floor. My voice rang out over the tense assembly, “As my name is Ironhand, ere the next day’s sun dawns, my hand shall bear the dragon’s heart here before ye.”

Ceorgar leaped to his feet and roared, “Does this landless prince try to wed the king’s daughter?”

The three nobles who followed him smirked and shouted their agreement, but were quickly hushed by the heavy silence that descended. All waited.

“Does the destruction of a prince’s lands quench the royalty of his blood? Or does Aedán forbid foreigners from slaying dragons? Cannot I claim the prize as well as thou?” I asked, eyeing Ceorgar coldly. He bit his pompous lip and shot a venomous glance towards Balthild, whose eyes were fixed on mine in trusting love. Aedán looked at me, gravely bowing his head. The warriors shouted their joy as I turned and strode out of the hall into the twilight, casting one last glance at Balthild.

The pungent wind stung my nostrils, its chillness wafting over my hot spirit. Memories of my last dragon hunt mocked me again as images of my slaughtered father and brothers turned my heart sore. Bitterness rose in me as the sight of Ceorgar’s glance and the memory of Ceorgar’s insults to Balthild filled my mind: thus does foiled lust turn to hate. I looked up at the stars and prayed, “Christ, strengthen my hand this night, and bring me victory for her sake.” I quickened my steps to the eotanweard’s hill – Ceorgar would not wed Balthild while breath remained in me.

The night was silent, and a mist hung over the hill. I crouched, sweeping my eyes over the horizon: the eotanweard was not visible. I ran to his hill, and sinking into the ground was the dark pool of his blood. A severed arm lay by it, still clenching the broken sword that had shattered on the beast’s scaled hide in his dying effort. With growing trepidation, I bent and saw a trail leading away. I ran along it into the sliding, dense whiteness of the mists, not daring to hesitate.

The wyrm came on me silently, a demon phantom of night. For a moment, my sight was filled by its gaping, iron-toothed maw. I acted instantly, born of long training, striking violently at its jaw and lunging close to its chest. It contorted hungrily, struggling to get at me as I gripped its arm and held myself out of reach. Viciously, I thrust upwards, twisting the claw. I felt the shrieking scream from the dragon transpierce my mind and echo over the desolate hills, smiting into my bones even before its joint cracked. Something smote me in the breast, and I fell, gasping, to the ground, drenched in the beast’s blood.

I lost my hold. The thought lashed my numbed mind with uncertainty, yet I stumbled to my feet and ran after the vanishing monster, following its clear trail. I smiled grimly, for this time it was its own blood that stained the grass. A shadow moved and I looked back to see a horse with a rider in princely clothes, cantering in and out of the mists. The cold blackness of fear haunted me. Yet I followed the track deep into the fens, until I came to a darkly glimmering pool with red ripples spreading over the surface. The wyrm had entered there.

The coldness of sharp iron pierced me; evil pain exploded my shoulder; my face struck the grumy earth.

“Where are thy friends, Ceorgar?” I asked, terrified lest my voice break in my exhaustion. I drew out the spear as Ceorgar ran into the clearing with blade drawn.

“I thank thee, Ironhand, for helping me win my prize. Thou hast done thy part now.”

He dived for me, blade glittering in the moonlight, and I heaved out my sword, exploding from the ground to meet him. He was a fierce fighter, cunning and deadly, and he pressed me hard. But Balthild’s face gleamed always in my eye, and I drove him back until he was on the brink of the mere, fear in his eyes.

“In selfishness I once hunted a colony of mountain dragons. In their stirred up wrath they slew my family and my people,” I hissed, pressing forward. “It is not for myself that I go forth now.”

Like a snake, he thrust at me, but I turned it aside, wrapping my fingers about his wrist. He dropped his sword. I thrust him into the mere, his scream echoing in my ears.

The raging wyrm erupted from the murky waters even while Ceorgar struggled to mount the bank. It placed its mighty heel on Ceorgar’s helpless body, bending its deathly head. It tore his heart out as I took up Ceorgar’s spear and cast it into its throat. Spurning Ceorgar’s corpse, it turned towards me, the shaft protruding from between its teeth. I looked at it wearily. I had never doubted that I would kill the dragon with some degree of ease. It was my pride. I raised my sword. The monster swayed over me, weak from loss of blood, then fell, striking the spear shaft into its skull.

I rushed on it, plunging my sword into its breast to assure its death and to cut my spoils from it. A snort sounded on my ear, and I turned to see Ceorgar’s steed caught in a thicket. I bound the dead body of its master to its back beside my trophies, and then, leading my grim load, I wended my way out of the marshes as the light began to change the crisp air into morning.

My heart sang as I saw the last warriors assembling, and I commanded the doors to be opened. I strode before the expectant assembly, cast the long tip of the dragon’s tail to the floor, and held up the huge heart in my hand. Shouts of satisfaction and astonishment echoed around me, but I heard them not. Blood streamed from my torn arms and pierced back down my tattered garments. My victory was not of me, but of the Creator who had given the dragon into my hand.

“Thou art wounded, and not by dragon’s tooth or claw,” a voice said behind me.

I gave a piercing whistle in answer, and Ceorgar’s steed with its black burden stepped in. The assembly leaned forward and Ceorgar’s followers turned gray. “By God’s grace I have rid your land of a fell beast, my lord,” I cried out, “and of a man more fell.” I whipped the cloak from the pallid body. Aedán stood up and Balthild paled. “What is my reward, O king?” I asked, looking deeply into my beloved’s eyes. The dawn’s rays glowed in her hair as Aedán took her hand and smiled.

Principle Five

Felicitous greetings and salutations,

Reformer’s Unanimous is a faith-based addictions program dedicated to helping those bound by the shackles of sin to find liberty through Christ. They have assisted me greatly in the time that I have spent in their program and in the study of their materials. They have shown great wisdom in their understanding of the problems that beset us in our struggles in the process of sanctification. One of the bits of wisdom that Steve Currington, its founder and president, has propagated is the Ten Principles of RU. These ten principles are founded in Scripture, and are true and helpful to every Christian who is wanting to find Christ’s victory over sin in his life. Therefore, I am expounding these ten principles in a series of posts spread out over this month. This is the fifth.

SMALL COMPROMISES LEAD TO GREAT DISASTERS.

(Little Sins Lead To Big Sins.)

People talk about how they need to fight and beat the Big Sins. Drugs. Hard Core Pornography. Smoking. Of course, some people don’t think those are big sins at all, and of course those people are not going to find liberty from them. Some people don’t think that lust, hate, anger, bitterness, and envy are Big Sins. They say that they will deal with those when they take care of the Big ones. I know. I was one of those people.

But.

It.

Is.

A.

Lie.

You cannot defeat any ‘big sin ‘until you realize how much God hates the ‘little sins.’ God considers unjust hatred to be equal with murder. Lust to be equal to adultery. Envy to be equal to idolatry. Period. No escape.

If you surrender to your flesh, death comes.

If you yield to the Holy Spirit of God, life comes.

If life comes, it begets more life.

If death comes, it begets more death.

That is the way it happens.

You cannot let sin rule in your life in what you call the ‘little’ areas and expect God to bring you victory in what you call the ‘big’ areas. You need to attack sin’s strongholds in every area of your life.

With joy and peace in Christ,

Jay Lauser